Contacts    Download Data

NDIS Home Page Hunting Page Fishing Page Wildlife Species Page Exploring Habitat Page Conservation/Planning Page Navigation Menu

Wildlife Species



Wildlife Home
Amphibians
Frogs
Salamanders
Toads
Birds
Birds of Prey
Blackbirds
Bobolink
Chickadees, Nuthatches, and Allies
Cormorants
Cowbirds
Cranes
Cuckoos & Anis
Dippers
Finches
Flycatchers
Grackles
Grouse, Quails and Allies
Hummingbirds
Jays, Magpies & Crows
Kingfishers
Larks
Meadowlarks
Orioles
Owls and Nightjars
Pelicans
Pigeons & Doves
Pipits
Rails & Allies
Shorebirds
Shrikes
Silky Flycatchers
Starlings
Swifts & Swallows
Thrushes
Vireos
Waders
Warblers, Sparrows & Allies
Waterfowl
Waxwings
Woodpeckers
Wrens
Fish
Bass, Sunfish & Perch
Carp, Chubs & Minnows
Catfish & Bullheads
Drums
Eel & Gar
Herring & Shad
Killifish
Livebearers
Pike
Salmon, Trout & Char
Sculpin
Silversides
Smelt
Sticklebacks
Sturgeon
Suckers & Buffalofish
Tilapia
Mammals
Armadillos
Bats
Bears
Cats
Chipmunks & Squirrels
Hoofed Mammals
Large Rodents
Mice & Rats
Opossums
Otters
Pocket Gophers
Porcupine
Prairie Dogs
Rabbits, Hares & Pika
Raccoons & Ringtails
Shrews & Moles
Skunks, Weasels & their Kin
Voles & Muskrats
Wolves, Foxes, & Coyote
Reptiles
Lizards
Skinks
Snakes
Turtles
Vipers
Whiptails


CDOW Website NDIS Home

Wildlife Moose Page


Return to species list...
This copyrighted photograph is the sole proprietorship of the photographer.  Unauthorized use is a violation of federal copyright laws.
Photo by: D. Robert Franz
 Moose
 Alces alces

Habitat: Introduced in Colorado, moose are inhabitants of boreal forest edge and openings in forests adjacent to water. They are dependent on early successional stages in areas that have been recently burned, logged, or manipulated by beavers (Wolfe 1974).

Diet: Daily forage intake (dry weight) is estimated to be 5 kg in winter and about 11 kg in warmer months. Typical moose range in the Rocky Mountains includes a mixture of willow, spruce, fir, aspen, or birch. Willows are a winter staple on many western ranges (Peek 1974). During spring, summer, and fall, moose also utilize a variety of herbaceous vegetation including grasses, sedges, aquatic emergents, and forbs.

Description: Largest of the cervids, moose are black, chocolate brown, or reddish brown with paler legs and belly. The winter pelage is grayer. Calves are reddish or rusty and lack the white spots characteristic of other young cervids. The long hair is coarse, brittle, and longer on the neck and shoulders than elsewhere. The front legs are longer than the hindlegs, creating a sloping back. There are four hooves on each foot; two are reduced in size and elevated as dewclaws. The large head has a long, broad muzzle and a heavy, bulbous nose pad. A fold of skin, the "bell" or dewlap, dangles from the throat region. Ears are large and erect. The tail is short and inconspicuous.

Range in Colorado: The habitat of the original introduced herd in North Park was willow and lodgepole pine at an elevation of 2,700 to 2,850 m (8,850-9,350 ft). Since then, animals from this population have been reported in several adjacent areas, including Middle Park, the upper reaches of the Laramie and Cache la Poudre rivers, and Rocky Mountain National Park. Other sightings have been reported in South Park, near Leadville, near Gunnison, near Yampa, and west of Denver.


Status: CDOW Big Game, CDOW WRIS Species


County Occurrence Map







         Contacts     Download Data     Wildlife     Exploring Habitat    









   spacer image








Species Occurrence Tool


Occurrence by County

Data Format:
HTML
Delimited Text
MS-Excel

 


(*) NDIS has no county occurrence data for fish at this time.

separator bar

Moose NDIS Maps
  Colorado Hunting Atlas


separator bar

Moose Specific Links
  GAP Habitat Map


General Wildlife Links
  Colorado Audubon
  Colorado Birding Society
  Colorado Field Ornithologist's
  Rocky Mnt. Bird Observatory
  TNC Migratory Bird Program